Choosing a career path As interesting as it may sound, choosing a career path can be daunting as well as confusing for some people. The endless ‘what ifs’ that accompany deciding which field to go for or against could sometimes be exasperating.

Choosing A Career Path

As interesting as it may sound, choosing a career path can be daunting as well as confusing for some people.

The endless ‘what ifs’ that accompany deciding which field to go for or against could sometimes be exasperating. However, choosing a career is one of the most important decisions any individual would have to make at some point in their lives.

To make the right decision, careful consideration and meticulous planning is required, especially if one desires to land the job of a lifetime. To help you chart a course, we have outlined several tips.

Tips for Choosing a career path:

1.    Determine Your Skills
According to Career Advisor, Shay Nolan, there is a four-stage model of competence that aids skills to determine a person’s skills.
•    Unconscious incompetence
When a person does not know what they are good at, this is mostly, because they haven’t taken the time to evaluate their skills.
•    Unconscious competence
They are good at something to the point that they almost do it on autopilot. There is also a danger that they can become complacent here.
•    Conscious incompetence
They are not good at a particular thing and they know it! At the very least though, there is an awareness which can lead to skills development.
•    Conscious competence
They know what to do, though it takes some effort. This is where they want to be as there is both competence and awareness. This means that a person’s skills require a lot of consideration if they are to make well-informed career decisions. Ask some key questions:
What do I do really well?
What areas for development do I have?
What are the skills that I really enjoy using?
The final question represents an excellent starting point in terms of looking at how a person’s skills can help to inform what career path they should consider.

2.    Take Opportunities to Play the Field
A footballer who remains on the bench will never make a mark. Do not shy away from seizing opportunities whenever they present themselves, do not hesitate to participate in team-building activities that require you to put your skills to use.

3.    Aspire and Work to Reach Your Goal
Dream big, have confidence in your ability and constantly put your skills to work. Set goals for yourself – daily, weekly, monthly and yearly goals and keep moving.

4.    Seek Career Contentment
When you love your job and work with a reliable team, you are more innovative and productive, your level of confidence soars and you are filled with a sense of purpose because you know you are adding value. This feeling of contentment does wonder for your morale, you will hardly get tired or bored with your job, instead, you will find yourself constantly exploring innovative ways to better your performance and outdo yourself.

Building a great workplace structure

DEVELOPING A GREAT WORKPLACE CULTURE

There was a time when the brand value of an organization and remuneration paid to workers made an organization a desirable place to work.

However, today’s workplace has evolved to the extent that fat pay cheques, generous tips, and bonuses can no longer attract or keep employees, especially when the workplace is toxic. Sadly, organizations lose great talents because of their failure to put a premium on developing a healthy organizational culture.

A healthy workplace culture is what attracts talents and imbues them with a sense of loyalty which binds them to the organization and makes them continually give their best to ensure the company stays in business and is profitable.

What constitutes workplace culture? you might ask; Workplace culture refers to those intangible attributes of an organization that makes it a great or toxic place to work in, these attributes are largely defined by the ideology that drives the organization.

These ideologies are often reflected how employees related to management as well as one another. Inclusivity Consultant and Behavioural Scientist, Dr Pragyal Agarwal maintains that positive workplace culture improves teamwork, raises the morale, increases productivity and efficiency, and enhances retention of the workforce.

Job satisfaction, collaboration, and work performance are all enhanced. And, most importantly, a positive work environment reduces stress in employees. The following are simple ways an organization can improve their workplace culture:

1. Communication and collaboration: a workplace culture that values and encourages open and honest communication, feedback and teamwork are all vital for improving workplace culture.

2. Continued learning opportunities: knowledge sharing, brainstorming sessions as well as social interactions within the office all add up to improve the workplace culture of an organization.

3. All-inclusive work environment: value, support and encourage all employees regardless of gender, ethnicity, social or religious orientation. All employees should have equal access to growth and advancement opportunities, bonuses and general goodwill.

4. Establish trust: employees should be able to confide in management and have honest conversations with one another without fear of being judged. Again, trust that you have a good and dependable team.

5. Make onboarding of new staff easy and warm: get an old and friendly team member to take the new staff around and acquaint them with the rest of the team, answer their questions and help set up their workspace. A great workplace culture takes time, effort and dedication to develop, but it is worth it. The first step is to have frank a conversation with your team and communicate your vision for the company to them in clear terms and ensure they identify with it; once this is achieved, the rest will easily fall in place.

Teamwork In The Workplace

“Teamwork is the process of working collaboratively with a group of people in order to achieve a goal” – Business Dictionary - workplace, teamwork, career tips, career success, recruitment tips, work, office tips, corporate behavior, workplace ethics, soft skills, workplace skills

(3 Minutes Read)

There isn’t a more concise phrase that captures and explains teamwork better than the adage “Two heads are better than one”, every other explanation simply puts the adage into perspective, lending it more credence.

For argument’s sake, we should perhaps visit a few of the existing definitions.

“Teamwork is the process of working collaboratively with a group of people in order to achieve a goal”Business Dictionary.

Teamwork is the ability to work together toward a common vision. The ability to direct individual accomplishment toward organizational objectives”  – Andrew Carnegie.

There is also no phrase that expresses the need for collaboration as adequately as the adage “No man is an island”. This adage translates to the fact that no single individual has a monopoly of knowledge, thereby necessitating the adoption of teamwork.

Efficiency is bolstered where there is knowledge sharing through brainstorming sessions, which introduces fresh ideas as opposed to dated ideas resulting from working alone. Again, there is also a pool of creatively unique as well as diverse viewpoints to be engaged with.

Benefits of teamwork in the workplace

Working together allows team members build on the skillset of their teammates, while one person’s strength may be in IT, another may be in critical thinking, content creation, project management or even public relations, when each team member’s talent is exploited, there is a resultant blend of complementary strengths from which individual members of the team can benefit.

Teamwork promotes a wider sense of ownership mentality where each employee begins to see themselves as co-owners of the business. This, in turn, reflects on the growth and ultimately the profit margin of the business as new business strategies are introduced, refined and executed.

Understanding Generation Z- the new entrants to the workplace.

Generation Z refers to young people who were born between roughly 1996 and 2010.- those who typically were born into a technologically advanced world that is simply unable to do without the internet.

As recruiters and perhaps potential employers of labour, it is important to understand the characteristics that define these new set of job seekers so as to be able to manage their expectations and help them to succeed in life.

Characteristics of Gen Z

  1. They are technologically advanced from an early age and learn to use smart phones very early in life.
  2. They develop a strong ability to communicate electronically via mobile apps and online platforms even before they start school.
  3. They have an incredible ability to search out information on the internet and absorb copious amounts of information.
  4. They are strong multi-taskers, able to handle diverse tasks and projects at the same time
  5. Their attention span is very low unfortunately and they are ready to move on to the next activity within short time periods
  6. They tend to be more independent and autonomous than millennials (the Generation before them) and many of them are eager to start their own businesses much earlier in life.

Motivating Gen Z

A good understanding of the above traits will go a long way in placing Gen Zers in the workplace. Monotonous or routine jobs would be a turn off for these high paced set of employees. Tasks that enhance their innate creative abilities and promote an entrepreneurial spirit would be very desirable and would stimulate increased productivity and performance.  

Long gone are the days of long service in companies. The new generation, not unlike the Millennials are not looking forward to long service company awards. They are highly mobile and enjoy the here and now. Jobs that enable them to be involved in projects and where possible allow them to travel and work remotely would be best suited for this cohort.

 Fluid workplace arrangements with less rigid structures, policies and practices may very soon become the order of the day in even the most conservative of corporate organisations.