COVID-19: A LETTER TO OUR TEAM By Erik Reagan, CEO FOCUS LAB.

COVID-19: A LETTER TO OUR TEAM

It’s been surreal to watch COVID-19 make its mark across the globe. From international coverage, national declarations, state-wide news conferences, and city updates, we’ve had a lot of things in front of us. I wanted to take a few minutes to collect my thoughts and plans for Focus Lab so we can continue to be operating from the same play

1. NOW, MORE THAN EVER, WE NEED TO BE PATIENT WITH ONE ANOTHER AND EXTEND GRACE IN ALL DIRECTIONS. THAT INCLUDES PATIENCE AND GRACE WITH AND FOR YOURSELF.

You may find yourself or others struggling to attend our regular meetings with new things happening around us during work hours. Or perhaps meetings are fine, but it’s a struggle to create the same space for deep work that we had previously. Whatever the changes and struggles, know that you have the support and encouragement of your team leaders to flex your schedule around in a way that works best for your family and your projects.

When the chance to be present to people’s thoughts and feelings arrives, we show up. And we do so with an earnest desire to meet them where they are, from a place of openness and humility.

OUR CORE VALUE, “EMPATHY IN ACTION”

If you find that you need to adjust your work hours a bit, the most important thing is that you communicate this clearly to your team leader and those with whom you work closely.

Be gracious with and understanding of one another when unexpected things come up. Certain meetings may be less optimal for some time, simply due to the suddenness of these changes. I could write up all the tips in my head and on the internet and still not cover every possibility of what we might experience in working from home, so that leads me to my second call to action.

2. ADAPTABILITY WILL BE A FOUNDATIONAL TOOL THROUGHOUT THE COMING WEEKS.

If there’s one thing I can guarantee you for the coming weeks, it’s this: There will be surprises. From changes we’re making to how we work, to changes that our clients need to make, to types of change we can’t anticipate. Changes will come. And we all need to have a spirit and mind of adaptability. If we don’t approach each workday with the willingness to accept something new or unexpected, this will be much harder.

It’s time to flex this newly developed “Yes, and” muscle!

Some Personal Suggestions

If you would permit me, there are two things I want to mention I believe them to be valuable and worth mentioning to the team today.

The first is about your family budget. It’s yet unclear what the economic impact of COVID-19 will be on the globe. In this uncertainty, I think it’s wise to hone in on your financial management. Spend only where you need to for a time.

The second is about protecting your health. I’m talking not just about physical health, but also emotional and mental. Your health affects your ability to care for yourself and those around you. Here are a few things worth thinking about:

  • If you typically go to a gym, but can’t right now, consider some at-home exercise. Don’t just let the physical activity go to the wayside. 
  • Stay Hydrated
  • Close social media and news sources while you’re working.
  • Consider giving this article a read: How to Stay Emotionally Healthy During the Coronavirus Outbreak
  • Take time to breathe. If that sounds strange or new to you, I encourage you to check out your App Store for meditation apps that have useful guides for simple breathing practices.
  • Reach out to your friends and family. And I don’t mean via social media, but rather a voice or video call. Stay connected emotionally while we can’t all be connected physically.

WRAPPING UP

We’re all adjusting. We have a steady barrage of media coming our way during every moment that passes. So as we settle into our work week, work diligently to set the media to the side and be digitally present with your team, your work, and our clients. You might consider setting specific hours where you read on your state’s latest updates regarding COVID-19.

And lastly, as cheesy as it may sound, try to stay positive. It’s easy to get pulled out by the undertow of negativity. Yes, this is a negative worldwide event we’re experiencing. But we can’t allow that to result in us wearing negative lenses as we look at everything around us. Be cautious about how you’re looking at the things around you.

Prioritize gratitude.

Prioritize moments of silence.

Prioritize being fully present with those around you.

Prioritize positivity.

There was a man who traveled to a village to speak to a wise man. He said to the wise man, “I feel like there are two dogs inside me. One dog is positive, loving, kind, and optimistic and then I have this fearful, pessimistic, angry, and negative dog and they fight all the time. I don’t know who is going to win.” The wise man thinks for a moment and responds, “I know who is going to win. The one you feed the most. 

So feed the positive dog.”

There you have it. With each day that begins, feed the positive dog.

With Gratitude,


Erik.

Emotional outbursts happen when someone is triggered by a statement, action or treatment doesn't sit well with them.

Dealing With Emotional Outbursts in the Workplace

Apart from churches, market places, public events, the workplace is the only other place where you can find a great number of individuals from a different ethnic, socio-political, religious and educational background in constant communication and contact.

Although diversity in the workplace inspires team building, productivity and knowledge sharing, it is not without its challenges – challenges such as flaring tempers, hurt feelings and random outburst.

Each organization has its own set of criers, the ones who wear their hearts on their sleeves and respond to frustration, sadness, or worry through tears. There are also those who scream at the slightest provocation, table pounders who are aggressively invested in every decision. These kinds of emotional outbursts are not just uncomfortable; they can put a team in jeopardy, stall productivity and limit innovation.

According to Team Effectiveness Advisor, Liane Davey, an emotional person should not be allowed to postpone, dilute, or drag out an issue that needs to be resolved. Instead, the outburst should be taken for what it is: a communication; because emotions are clues that the issue being discussed is touching on something the person values or believes strongly in. Davey maintained that the outburst gives three sets of information: emotional data; factual or intellectual data; and motives, values and beliefs.

Davey adds that Managers get stuck when they only focus on the first two — emotions and facts; which is easy to do. For instance, when someone starts yelling, people might think they’re insane (emotion) because their project had just been defunded (fact). Many managers stop there because they find feelings uncomfortable or aren’t sure how to deal with them. That’s why the first step is to become more self-aware by questioning one’s mindset around emotions. There are several myths that often get in a team leader’s way:

Myth #1: There is no place for emotion in the workplace. If you have humans in the workplace, you’re going to have emotions too. Ignoring, stifling, or invalidating them will only drive the toxic issues underground. This outdated notion is one reason people resort to passive-aggressive behaviour: emotions will find their outlet; the choice is whether it’s out in the open or in the shadows.

Myth #2: We don’t have time to talk about people’s feelings. Do you have time for backroom dealings and subterfuge? Do you have time for re-opened decisions? Do you have time for failed implementations? Avoiding the emotional issues at the outset will only delay their impact. And when people don’t feel heard, their feelings amplify until you have something really destructive to deal with.

Myth #3: Emotions will skew our decision making. Emotions are already affecting your decision making. The choice is whether you want to be explicit about how (and how much) of a role they play or whether you want to leave them as unspoken biases. With your beliefs in check, you’ll be better able to get beyond the emotion and facts to the values the person holds that are being compromised or violated. This is critical because your criers and screamers are further triggered when they don’t feel understood. The key is to have a discussion that includes facts, feelings, and values. People will feel heard and the emotion will usually dissipate. Then you can focus on making the best business decision possible.

Here’s how.

Spot the emotion: If you wait until the emotion is in full bloom, it will be difficult to manage. Instead, watch for the tell-tale signs that something is causing concern. The most important signals will come from incongruence between what someone is saying and what their body language is telling you. When you notice someone is withdrawing eye contact or getting red in the face, acknowledge what you see. “Steve, you’ve stopped mid-sentence a couple of times now. What’s going on for you?”

Listen: Listen carefully to the response, both to what is said and what you can infer about facts, feelings, and values. You will pick up emotions in language, particularly in extreme words or words that are repeated. “We have a $2 million budget shortfall and it’s our fourth meeting sitting around having a lovely intellectual discussion!” Body language will again provide clues. Angry (leaning in, clenched jaw or fists) looks very different from discouraged (dropping eye contact, slumping) or dismissive (rolling eyes, turning away).

Ask questions: When you see or hear the emotional layer, stay calm, keep your tone level and ask a question to draw them out and get them talking about values. “I get the sense you’re frustrated. What’s behind your frustration?” Listen to their response and then go one layer further by testing a hypothesis. “Is it possible that you’re frustrated because we’re placing too much weight on the people impact of the decision and you think we need to focus only on what’s right for the business?”

Resolve It: If your hypothesis is right, you’ll probably see relief. They might even express their pleasure “Yes, exactly!” You can sum it up “We’ve talked about closing the Cleveland office for two years and you’re frustrated because you believe that the right decision for the business is obvious.” You’ve now helped your team member articulate the values he thinks should be guiding the decision. The team will now be clear on why they are disagreeing. Three people might jump in, all talking at once “We are talking about people who have given their lives to this organization!” Here we go again…Use the same process to reveal the opposing points of view.

Once everyone is working with the same three data sets — facts, emotions, and values — you will be clear what you need to solve for, in this case, how will we weigh the financial necessity with the impact on people. Although taking the time to draw out the values might seem slow at first, you’ll see that issues actually get resolved faster. And ironically, as you validate emotions, over time people will tend to be less emotional as it’s often the suppressing of the emotions or trying to cobble together facts to justify them that was causing irrational behaviour.

If you’re leading a high performing team, you better be ready to deal with uncomfortable, messy, complex emotions. If there’s a situation you have failed to address because of an emotional team member, spend some time thinking about how you will approach it and then go have the conversation. Today. You can’t afford to wait any longer.

Culled from EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE: Handling Emotional Outbursts on Your Team by Liane Davey, Author, Leadership Solutions.

"People who dress better are typically treated better at work," says David McKnight, a New York City-based image consultant. "They are usually given more responsibility and are shown much more respect."

THE RULES OF WORKPLACE STYLE

In today’s business-casual workplace and organizations operating from co-work spaces, suits and ties and formal dresses no longer seem to be the standard, not even in financial institutions; however, the way a person dresses to the workplace still matters and to a large extent determines how they will be spoken to and treated.

“People who dress better are typically treated better at work,” says David McKnight, a New York City-based image consultant. “They are usually given more responsibility and are shown much more respect.”

Here are tips on what to wear and what not to wear — so you can make the best impression on your boss, colleagues and clients.

Business casual isn’t a fashion free-for-all,” says Susan Bixler, president and founder of the Bixler Consulting Group. The Atlanta-based consultant has created guidelines for business-casual dress for those just starting out, workers at mid-career and those eyeing the executive suite.

The “baseline” look starts with the three Big Nos

  1. No flip-flops
  2. No jeans
  3. No visible tattoos

Yes to:

  1. Tailored trousers
  2. long-sleeve shirts or tops

The “midstream” look is similar but with an emphasis on higher-quality fabrics while the executive version ups the sartorial ante by recommending jackets for men and trouser-style suits for women.

“Any time you want to add authority, put on the jacket,” says Bixler, the author of seven books, including The New Professional Image: From Business Casual to the Ultimate Power Look.

The General Rule:

In journalism, the editor would always as you “leave out”, if you’re unsure; the rule is different when it comes to dressing and style. If you are to attend an interview or a business meeting and are unsure about the dress code, you should ask in advance, then again, you can’t possibly be faulted for appearing in a jacket or suit. Wearing a suit to an interview, meeting or work is a nonverbal way of communicating the fact that you are in for serious business.

Curb excesses.

Clothes that are too tight, overly generous makeup, too much jewelry, and accessories as well as ‘loud’ fragrance.

Never show up to work in shorts, ripped jeans (not even on a Friday)

Avoid wearing dusty, unpolished shoes to work.

When it comes to dressing, women have more options while the playing field for men is quite narrow and straightforward.

Too Much Skin

“Edgy looks, especially those involving the baring of cleavage, skin or tattoos, rarely cut it at the office, unless you happen to work in a trend-conscious field like advertising or fashion.

“When you’re not sure whether something is appropriate for work, then there’s a 98 percent chance that it’s not,” McKnight says.

The Whole Look

Choosing the right clothing is just one component of your professional look, which includes good grooming and hygiene, as well as being well-rested and mentally ready to face the day.

“There are so many things we don’t have control over, but what we can control is the image of professionalism we show to the world,” Bixler says.

Teamwork In The Workplace

“Teamwork is the process of working collaboratively with a group of people in order to achieve a goal” – Business Dictionary - workplace, teamwork, career tips, career success, recruitment tips, work, office tips, corporate behavior, workplace ethics, soft skills, workplace skills

(3 Minutes Read)

There isn’t a more concise phrase that captures and explains teamwork better than the adage “Two heads are better than one”, every other explanation simply puts the adage into perspective, lending it more credence.

For argument’s sake, we should perhaps visit a few of the existing definitions.

“Teamwork is the process of working collaboratively with a group of people in order to achieve a goal”Business Dictionary.

Teamwork is the ability to work together toward a common vision. The ability to direct individual accomplishment toward organizational objectives”  – Andrew Carnegie.

There is also no phrase that expresses the need for collaboration as adequately as the adage “No man is an island”. This adage translates to the fact that no single individual has a monopoly of knowledge, thereby necessitating the adoption of teamwork.

Efficiency is bolstered where there is knowledge sharing through brainstorming sessions, which introduces fresh ideas as opposed to dated ideas resulting from working alone. Again, there is also a pool of creatively unique as well as diverse viewpoints to be engaged with.

Benefits of teamwork in the workplace

Working together allows team members build on the skillset of their teammates, while one person’s strength may be in IT, another may be in critical thinking, content creation, project management or even public relations, when each team member’s talent is exploited, there is a resultant blend of complementary strengths from which individual members of the team can benefit.

Teamwork promotes a wider sense of ownership mentality where each employee begins to see themselves as co-owners of the business. This, in turn, reflects on the growth and ultimately the profit margin of the business as new business strategies are introduced, refined and executed.